Adoption Books

Reading (process)
Reading (process) (Photo credits: www.mysafetylabels.com)
There is a saying that I have heard throughout my life that has stayed with me. The saying is: Rich people have libraries,  poor people have big TVs.

Now, this is in no way a derogatory remark towards those who struggle financially, but it is a testament to the power of knowledge and the importance of being educated about the things that are happening to you and around you. You can never be too prepared for anything, whether it is prior to entering into a sexual relationship, after realizing you have become pregnant, or trying to decide what your options are as a pregnant teen.

I have compiled a list of books that I would like to recommend if you are a teen anywhere in the United States facing the temptation of having sex, facing unplanned pregnancy, or wondering about your options, this literature can provide you with information to help you find your way.

This is not your mother’s book! It is a real look at teen sex and what you need to know:

https://www.amazon.com/Sex-Teens-Uncensored-Guide-Safety/dp/0981973329/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1386179716&sr=8-4&keywords=books+about+teen+pregnancy

This book is going to answer those confusing questions you have about your body and your heart:

https://www.amazon.com/Teen-Guide-Relationships-Jess-Scott/dp/1477411429/ref=pd_sim_b_5

Here is a complete guide for all things unplanned pregnancy:

https://www.amazon.com/Unplanned-Pregnancy-Teens-College-Students/dp/0974783234/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1386180002&sr=1-1&keywords=teen+pregnancy+books

A true story of one  young girl’s life turned upside down by teen pregnancy and much more!

https://www.amazon.com/Back-Prince-Charming-pregnancy-healing-ebook/dp/B00CPTTA64/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1386180119&sr=1-5&keywords=teen+pregnancy+books

If you are looking for answers to the tough questions regarding abortion, this is the book for you

https://www.amazon.com/Pro-Life-Answers-Pro-Choice-Arguments-Expanded/dp/1576737519/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1386180406&sr=1-7&keywords=books+about+abortion

It is recognized that those who take an active involvement in reading have “higher GPA’s, higher intelligence, and general knowledge than those [who] don’t.” (Stansberry). Reading is an indulgence that enhances our knowledge by making us use our brain and causing us to think more and therefore enhancing our intelligence. Since books help improve both memory and concentration, one can say that reading makes it easier to study a subject and retain the knowledge received from the subject, thus directly making someone more knowledgeable. Dr. Anne E. Cunningham, of the University of California Berkeley, has shown through studies that reading enhances analytical thinking, “Readers improve their general knowledge, and more importantly are able to spot patterns quicker.” (Stansberry). If one can spot patterns at a faster rate, then analytical skills are enhanced by speed. Books are used nearly every day in schools to teach difficult subjects, there is a reason why schools of all grades assign a variety of textbooks. This is because books hold a variety of information within their pages, of all subjects. Brian Tracy, a self-help author, has said that “one way to become an expert in your chosen field is to read 100 books on the subject.” (Isaac). To some, this may seem preposterous but the matter of fact is that different authors know different kinds of knowledge, and by exposing oneself to a large variety of books and absorbing their information with understanding, one can easily become an expert in a chosen subject.

It’s your life. Shouldn’t you be as much of an expert as possible?

 
Continue reading
  1119 Hits
1119 Hits

Adoption: Research the Love

Interracial adoption
Interracial adoption (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Teen pregnancy is often discouraging, confusing, and filled with difficult choices. The desire to keep your baby and do your best is tempting for a lot of young pregnant girls. Unfortunately, age, circumstances, financial distress, and many other factors make it nearly impossible to do so successfully. We encourage adoption because it allows you the opportunity to have the future you had planned before the unplanned occurred. It also gives you the chance to be a part of your child’s life if you want and see him grow into a well cared for individual who is loved and given opportunities that wouldn’t have been available to him as the child of a single teenaged mother. I would encourage you to research not only adoption as a process, but to also read some adoption stories and see how wonderful the experience can be for both sides involved. There are hundreds of beautiful adoption stories available to you online and it is obvious that adoptive parents have a very special and close bond with the birth mothers who choose them to be parents to their children. These testimonies can go a long way in easing your mind about how adoption can be and why it may be the right choice for you.

To help you get started, I wanted to share a short story that I came across recently. It is a simple and sweet letter about the adoption of her son and the decision change that the birth mother experienced, which resulted in a beautiful family being created.

You can read this inspiring story here:

http://www.standupgirl.com/sisterhood/letters/dear-becky/5093-the-love-behind-adoption.html

Continue reading
  1052 Hits
1052 Hits

Teen Pregnancy in the U.S. - You Are Not Alone

For those of you who may be feeling alone and wondering how many other young girls are facing an unplanned pregnancy as you are, I thought I’d share some statistics with you. As you can see, you are clearly not the only teen making the tough decisions that you are faced with today. Unplanned pregnancy happens in every state: Mississippi, Texas, California, Maine, Illinois. Teen girls become pregnant every day in the United States. Imagine if no one in your situation ever thought to choose adoption. Imagine the enormous number of young women who, statistically, would never finish high school or attend college. The amount of money that taxpayers would have to contribute so these young mothers and their children could have food and medical care would be astonishing. While this data regarding unplanned pregnancy among teens is shocking, there are options available that offer both you and your baby a successful future. Choosing adoption, not abortion, saves more than just one life.
 
Teen birth rates differ substantially by age, racial and ethnic group, and region of the country. Most adolescents who give birth are 18 or older; in 2012, 72 percent of all teen births occurred to 18- to 19-year-olds.[1] Birth rates are also higher among Hispanic and black adolescents than among their white counterparts. In 2012, Hispanic adolescent females ages 15-19 had the highest birth rate (46.3 births per 1,000 adolescent females), followed by black adolescent females (43.9 births per 1,000 adolescent females) and white adolescent females (20.5 births per 1,000 adolescent females) (see Figure 1).[1] Estimates from 2010 data show that one in seven adolescent females (14.4%) in the United States will give birth by her 20th birthday, with substantial differences by race/ethnicity: 10 percent of white adolescent females, 21 percent of black adolescent females, and 24 percent of Hispanic adolescent females.[3]
 
Although Hispanics currently have the highest teen birth rates, they have also the most dramatic recent decline in rates.  Since 2007, the teen birth rate has declined by 39% for Hispanics, compared with declines of 29% for blacks and 25% for whites.[4]

Figure 1: Birth rates per 1,000 females ages 15-19, by race/ethnicity, 1990-2012
 

Source: Hamilton, B. E., Martin, J. A., & Ventura, S. J.(2013). Births: Preliminary data for 2012. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.
 Substantial geographic variation also exists in adolescent childbearing across the United States. In 2010, the lowest teen birth rates were reported in the Northeast, while rates were highest in states across the southern part of the country (see Figure 2).[10]See how your state compares on birth rates, pregnancy rates, sexual activity, and contraceptive use with OAH’s reproductive health state fact sheets
 

Source: Martin, J. A., Hamilton, B. E., Ventura, S. J., & Osterman, M. J. K. (2013).Births: Final data for 2011. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.
Continue reading
  1145 Hits
1145 Hits

Adoption and the Holidays

This week, as we begin to celebrate being family and being thankful for life’s blessings, some of you may have questions about how to handle the holidays during or after an adoption. One expert shares her wisdom and offers answers for those difficult questions when it comes to what to do:


From Thanksgiving to the end of the year, everyone’s focus is on family. Even TV commercials show happy families celebrating the holidays together. As a result, this season can be painful for birthparents, especially if their contact with their children is minimal. And parents in open adoptions deliberate over what and how much to share with them. Will detailed information be painful—or reassuring—to the birthmother?

What you should keep in mind is that your son’s birthmother is a relative. You don’t have to love her, and she doesn’t have to be your best friend (as with some of your other relatives!)—but you should think of her as an extended family member. This is what open adoption is about. Knowing that he’s happy will help your son’s birthmother continue to feel good about the difficult decision she made eight years ago. And the holiday season is an especially important time to let her know you are thinking about her.

What to share

How can you let your son’s birthmother know she’s in your thoughts? The type of contact will depend on the relationship you have maintained over the years. If you have been in regular contact, whether by mail, phone, or visits with the family, your son’s birthmother will expect a detailed update or a get-together. If your contact has been more limited, I’m sure she’ll appreciate a letter and a photo.

Your son’s birthmother will enjoy hearing the details about his life—who he is at eight years old—his personality, his interests, his accomplishments. Parents might worry that details would be painful or would make the birthmother regret that she placed her child for adoption.

The reality is that the adoption plan was made out of love. She chose not to parent him, but she will always love him. So go ahead and tell her about the wonderful things your child does—that your son won the spelling bee at his school last year, for example, or that he’s learning to play the guitar.

You might ask your son what he’d like to share in a holiday letter to his birthmother. At his age, many children write their own letters to be enclosed in the holiday cards sent to the birth family. Or your son may want to draw a picture to send with your letter. By including him in this project, you gain an opportunity to talk with him again about his adoption story. You can remind him of the permanence of your family, as well as the love of his birthmother.

A 10-year-old I know, David, doesn’t visit with his birthmother, but he enjoys writing his own letter to her at holiday time. This year he talked about his accomplishments on the soccer field, and he asked her what her favorite sport is.

Many families also exchange gifts with their children’s birthparents at holiday time—as they do with other family members. If you have a close relationship with the birth family, consider a gift exchange. To children your son’s age, a gift from a birthparent is concrete evidence of her love; it attests to the fact that she thinks of him often.

Katie, an eight-year-old child I know, loves the teddy bear her birthmother gave her last Christmas. The bear sits on Katie’s bookshelf, and she tells visitors that it is from her birthmother, Susie. If you wanted to send a gift to your son’s birthmother, she’d surely cherish a framed photograph of him.

Whatever level of communication you have with your son’s birthmother, the holidays provide a wonderful opportunity to talk with your child about family and about all the people in his life who love him.

Kathleen Silber is the associate executive director of the Independent Adoption Center in Pleasant Hill, California, and coauthor of Dear Birthmother and Children of Open Adoption (Corona).

Continue reading
  878 Hits
878 Hits

As We Are Approaching Thanksgiving Let

As we are approaching Thanksgiving, let us remember to give thanks to the  birth  parents. Those who made the  though choice to give  birth  and then to  place.  To always remember that adoption is a choice.  To remember the birth parents with love in our hearts, for they made the kinder selfless choice.
Continue reading
  1045 Hits
1045 Hits

Is Abortion Better?

As a pregnant teen, you may feel overwhelmed with all of the information that you’re getting on what your options are. Obviously, adoption and parenting are things to think about, but it seems that a lot of young girls turn to the other option when faced with unplanned pregnancy - abortion.

Abortion is the process by which a newly conceived fetus is euthanized and removed from the mother’s womb. Pro Life activists refer to this fetus as a life, while Pro Choice activists call it a product of conception. Either way you look at it, abortion can have long lasting, potentially harmful, effects on a woman’s mind and, in some cases, her body. One woman recently shared her story with me. She is now in her 30s with children, but at one time, she was 16 and pregnant. She chose abortion.

“I was sixteen years old, invincible, and in love with a guy named Mike, who made me feel like I was the most important thing in his life. I wasn’t a bad kid, really, but I had been skipping school some to spend the day with him, he was a few years older and had already graduated. We were together for about 4 months when I found out that I was pregnant. He was set to go off to boot camp for the Marines soon and I still had two years of high school to go. I went to the local health department where they did a pregnancy test, and confirmed what I already knew. He was shocked, to say the least, and our relationship immediately began to unravel. I have often wondered, had he been more supportive, would I have made a different choice? I felt very alone, and almost as if I were the only one to blame, despite the fact that he had just as much responsibility in it as I did. He began ignoring my phone calls, stopped coming over, and even when I saw him out in public with friends, he didn’t talk to me. I was an outcast, abandoned by the boy I loved and who I thought had loved me. I think he even started to see someone else. My parents had divorced recently and while I did tell my mom about the pregnancy, I never did tell my father. My mom was really great about the whole thing, though she did make me say the words out loud long after she figured out what was going on in the midst of my uncontrollable sobbing. She said she’d support whatever decision I made, but did express her opinion that motherhood might not be the best option for me at such a young age. After a couple of weeks, I made the decision to end the pregnancy. I wish I hadn’t.”

As a young, pregnant teen, sometimes there is the assumption that abortion will solve the problem and life will resume normally, but that’s not always the case.

“My boyfriend, though he could scarcely be called that by that point, had agreed to pay for the abortion and when he brought the money over, I had my best friend take it from him while I hid in the other room. I couldn’t even bear to look at him, after the cold way that he had treated me the past few weeks. My mom and I left very early one morning and headed to Atlanta for my appointment at the clinic. My mom’s car, which had never given her any trouble, broke down on the way there and for the 100th time, I questioned my decision. We got towed to the shop and my appointment was rescheduled for the next week. I had time to change my mind, but I didn’t. I felt as if I were helplessly being propelled forward on autopilot. The next week, the car didn’t break down and I went through with the procedure. I don’t think that I even really knew what I had done. I just knew I wasn’t pregnant anymore. I was lucky that the abortion didn’t leave any lasting damage, as can sometimes happen, and I did go on to have children later in life. Becoming a mom really made me aware of what I had done and even though it has been almost 20 years, I still think about it often and I am aware each year when Fall comes around that I would have given birth at that time. I wish I could go back and tell that young, frightened girl that it’s okay to not be ready for parenthood, but it doesn’t mean you have to end a life. I wish I could tell her to choose adoption. I wish there had been more information available to her about adoption and that someone would’ve told her she could choose open adoption and not have to miss out on her child’s life. All I can do now is encourage other young girls in the same situation to really consider adoption as the answer and save them the heartache that eventually comes when you make the choice to end a life.”

Adoption is an option that you can feel good about. These days, adoption is accepted as a good choice and the right thing to do. Only you can decide what is right for you, but don’t forget to choose what is right for your baby, too.

Continue reading
  992 Hits
992 Hits

I'm Pregnant: What Should I do Now?

Discovering you’re pregnant as a teen can be a really frightening experience. Take a deep breath and know that you’re not alone. Right this very minute, there are girls just like you in Atlanta, Denver, Los Angeles, and Dallas who are most likely asking themselves the same questions you’re asking yourself now. The most important question is probably, “Now that I’m pregnant, what should I do?”

You may have thoughts, as many pregnant teens do, of keeping your baby. You have this idea in your head that you, your boyfriend, and the baby will live happily ever after. Unfortunately, that isn’t a realistic scenario. The majority of teen boys who father babies, don’t maintain an active role in the child’s life and can’t provide much financial support, if any. In some cases, the stress of an unplanned pregnancy is enough to cause a breakup.

According to chicagohealth77.org., teen mothers have less education, have poor health, and more likely to rely on public assistance. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by age 22, compare with 90% of girls who do not give birth during adolescence. Births to teenagers are at much higher risk for low both and preterm labor, as well as death in infancy, compared to babies born to women in their 20’s and older.

These are some pretty bleak statistics and ones that should make you think about what the best option might be for you and your baby. Teen motherhood is not something to be taken lightly. There is a lot to consider and one of those options is adoption. Adoption can provide you with a solution that will give your child the life you wish you could provide, but know you can’t. Adoption can even offer you the opportunity to stay in contact with your child and see him or her grow up and have the happy life you chose for your baby.

It’s a confusing time and there are probably a lot of people telling you what you should do. Your parents, the baby’s father, your friends, and everyone else all have an idea of what your next steps should be. Don’t be pressured. Let us help you explore adoption and the many wonderful ways it can be the best solution in the case of your unplanned pregnancy. Your baby deserves the best chance possible at the best life possible. You do, too. Teen pregnancy and single parenting doesn’t have to be your future.

We can help you decide if adoption is the right choice for you. We’re here to answer all of your questions and assist you in coming up with a plan to place your baby with a loving family who will honor you as the birth mother and give your child the life you wish you could.

Continue reading
  709 Hits
709 Hits

Why Adoption?

Why do people choose to adopt? There are various reasons and the majority of them are listed here.
They are the 1 in 8 couples who cannot get pregnant due to infertility They have medical reasons why it would not be safe to carry a child through pregnancy They are single and would love to be a parent They are a gay or lesbian couple who need adoption to become parents They have always loved adoption and prefer it as the way to start or expand their family
Whatever the reason for choosing to adopt, an unplanned pregnancy can be the answer for any one of these and doesn’t have to be viewed as a mistake or something to be terminated. Instead of looking at an unplanned pregnancy as the end of something (your freedom, your education, your goals, a life), look at it as the beginning of something. You can choose to be responsible for giving another person, or couple, the family they have always longed for. The heartache and hopelessness that is felt by these individuals for not being able to create a life is no different than what you may be feeling because you did. You created the life, now it’s time to choose the right family to provide for it. Having an unfulfilled education or not being financially stable doesn’t make you a bad mom. On the contrary, realizing the needs of your child and choosing to provide those to him or her through adoption makes you an amazing mom.

Only those who have chosen adoption, or adopted, can truly understand the amount of love that is involved. That love is made even stronger by the sacrifice, the longing, the emotion, the trust, the bonds that are created, and all of the ingredients that go into this unique recipe for a family. Placing your child for adoption with loving, stable, financially sound parents is a precious gift that only you can give -  not only for the family, but for the child.

Continue reading
  423 Hits
423 Hits

I Had Lunch Sunday With Old Birthmother

I had lunch Sunday with an old birthmother. Not old in years but 26 years ago she placed a baby boy with my help with a loving family here in Los Angeles. She came back to Los Angeles because the adopting mother had passed away and she attended the memorial. We talked about how the adopting parents had helped to redirect her life. She talked about how she never look back with regret but only thought about how this little boy would grow up and have the possibility of a better and greater life then she could've provided him at the time.  She had an open adoption, and kept in touch with the adopting parents and this little boy throughout his 26 years.

I felt honored that she called me to see if I would be willing to meet with her. I jumped at the chance. I'm so glad that I did and had a chance to hug this beautiful selfless woman again after all  these years.

Continue reading
  679 Hits
679 Hits

Why Do I Need an Adoption Attorney?

An adoption attorney is one of the most important people you will meet when going through the adoption process. The process is long and, for someone who has never been through it, can seem complicated at times. Adoption is a big decision, for birth parents and adoptive parents, and it helps to have the knowledge and compassion of a professional who specializes in it. You’re going to have questions - lots of them. Your adoption attorney is there to answer them and set your mind at ease.

The adoption attorney will begin the process by the filing the initial paperwork needed to get started and see it through until the placement is completed. He or she will have a clear understanding of your state’s laws on adoption and can explain them to you in layman’s terms so there is no confusion about what your rights are. Your attorney will be present at any and all proceedings that take place during the adoption process and guide you step by step the entire way. Adoption is an emotional experience and having someone on your side to keep you informed and offer advice is a welcome presence.

When choosing an adoption attorney, be sure that you feel comfortable with him or her. Trust your instincts and take the time to do some research on that person’s qualifications. It is extremely important that you feel confident your attorney understands what you want. Whether you are choosing an open or closed adoption, private or through an agency, your attorney should always respect your choices and listen with the intent to be helpful. If, at any point, you feel you are being pressured to do things differently than you planned, speak up and make your intentions clear. Your adoption attorney is there for you. The right attorney understands the difficult choice you have made and maintains a professional disposition.

Adoption is a beautiful choice, but not always an easy one. The benefits of having an expert with your best interests in mind at your side throughout the process are immeasurable. If adoption is something you’re considering and you have questions, rest assured that an adoption attorney can answer them for you. You don’t have to feel alone in this decision; with an attorney there to guide you, you’re not.

Continue reading
  688 Hits
688 Hits

Open Adoption

Adoption has come a long way in the past few decades. Gone are the days when a young woman would give birth without ever laying eyes on her baby and never know anything about where he went after leaving the room in the arms of a swiftly walking nurse. Today, a birth mother has so many options when it comes to choosing adoption.

Open adoption experienced a burst of popularity in the early 90’s and continues to be favored for many reasons today. Open adoption allows the birth mother to retain some connection with her child while still ensuring that he has the best life possible. While there are varying degrees of contact, and these must be agreed upon by the adoptive parents, an open adoption can make it possible for the birth parents to receive photos, updates, and even visits with the child. Certainly, being able to see the stability and happiness that you have provided by trusting your child to a loving family makes it clear that you made the right choice.

Since open adoption focuses on interaction between the birth mother and the adoptive parents, the birth parents are offered the opportunity to choose the couple that will raise their child. Portfolios of families who are all waiting for a child to love are looked through carefully, studied, and narrowed down to just a few. Then, there is normally a meeting arranged so the future parents can all meet and a final decision can be made. If geographically possible, the chosen adoptive parents can participate in doctor visits, ultrasounds, and eventually the birth of their soon to be child. This helps create a bond and a sense of trust between the parents and the birth mother. Often times, the adoptive mother will be present at the delivery and the first to hold the child. In an open adoption, the birth mother has no reason to feel as if she will never see her son or daughter again and this gesture is a beautiful way to put the adoptive parents’ minds at ease.

In addition to maintaining contact with your child, open adoption also makes it possible to provide medical history, genealogy, and family updates so your child never has to wonder where he came from. This can prove to be invaluable if ever faced with a medical emergency or questions about his birth family arise.

These days, non traditional families are the norm and open adoption is just one of the amazing ways some of those families are formed. If you’re pregnant, and scared, adoption can offer you  hope and a solution that will allow you the best of both worlds - a life where you can know your child and still follow your dreams.

Continue reading
  645 Hits
645 Hits

Pregnant? Adoption is an Option

For some women, seeing the plus sign on the little white stick isn’t a joyful moment. Instead, it is a moment where you find yourself consumed with fear, worry, and panic.  You’re pregnant. You didn’t mean for it to happen, yet the proof is right there in your hand. You begin to think about all of the ways this is going to affect your life and how you could ever possibly manage being a parent. Will you finish school? Can you afford to have a baby? What is the father going to say?  

According to the website www.dosomething.org, more than half of teen mothers never graduate from high school and less than 2% of teen moms earn a college degree by age 30. This is most likely due to the fact that it takes a considerable amount of money to raise a child, so these young moms must forfeit their education and maintain full time employment instead. Unfortunately, without an education, the earning potential for these young girls is not going to be nearly enough to meet the needs of a newborn. A simple package of diapers averages about $18 and a new baby will go through ten to twelve of those in a day. Many times, teen moms find themselves forced to rely on government assistance for health care, groceries, and even housing. CNN recently reported that it will cost a middle class couple $241, 080 to raise a child born in 2012 for eighteen years. That amount does not include the cost of college. Sadly, most teen moms find themselves alone with little or no support from the baby’s father.   

Unplanned pregnancy doesn’t have to be a hopeless situation; there is a way to be a wonderful parent without having to go through the struggle of trying to make ends meet and giving up on your goals. Adoption provides you with a solution that not only enables your child to have the best life possible, but for you to have your best life, as well. With adoption, you can be certain that he/she will never go without, will never feel like a burden to you, and will be loved unconditionally by parents who have longed for, even prayed for, the very child that you have entrusted to them.   

There is sometimes a misconception that allowing someone to adopt your child is selfish and you only did it so your life wouldn’t be disrupted. That couldn’t be farther from the truth. The love that it takes to realize you aren’t able to provide for another life at this time is immeasurable, the strength is takes is admirable, but the future that it provides for everyone involved is what makes adoption the best thing that you could ever do when faced with an unplanned pregnancy.
Continue reading
  619 Hits
619 Hits

The Congressional Coalition Adoption

The Congressional Coalition  on Adoption Institute has some very interesting articles that relate to adoption. Go to their website www.ccainstitute.org for information and research on the adoption tax credit as well as the Coalition's response to the rehoming article from Reuters.

For those readers of  blog who might be more interested in surrogacy. There's some recent developments from the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs. Those foreign nationals seeking to enter India for the purposes of commissioning an Indian surrogate must now apply for a medical visa in order to do so.  Also, only heterosexual couples who been married for two years are eligible to receive a medical visa.

Continue reading
  639 Hits
639 Hits

The 2014 Adoption Expense Tax Credit Is

The 2014 Adoption Expense Tax Credit is $13,190. This is the allowed credit for a child with special needs. As to private or agency adoptions the qualified expenses is up to $13,190. Remember it is  a downward scale based upon income. I recommend you discuss the adoption tax credit with a tax expert before you prepare your taxes, to be sure you are entitled to the credit claimed.
Continue reading
  638 Hits
638 Hits

November Is Adoption Awareness Month

November is Adoption Awareness Month. If you haven't already tuned into The Today Show you should.  This morning they finalized 12 families live on air.  An adoption finalization is a beautiful moment for everyone. Thank you Today.
Continue reading
  574 Hits
574 Hits

The U

The U.S. Supreme Court today reversed the South Carolina Supreme Court in the ADOPTIVE COUPLE v. BABY GIRL. This is the long awaited ICWA case. By reversing the decision the Court ruled in favor of the adoptive couple.
Continue reading
  601 Hits
601 Hits

U

U.S. Senators introduced a bill to Create a National Responsible Father Registry. In her statement Sen. Landrieu stressed that this national registry would be valuable to fathers across the country.  A national registry would ensure that any man who fathers a child and wishes to act in a responsible manner may have a chance to be involved in the child's life. Under this legislation, a father needs to register within a certain period of time if he wishes to be a responsible parent. If he fails to register the child could be adopted without fear of the father coming forward.

Responsible Father Registries currently exist in 34 states.

I applaud this bipartisan legislation.

Continue reading
  600 Hits
600 Hits

For All Who Interested In Adoption

For all who interested in adoption, there is an online magazine. Check out adoptionvoicesmagazine.com  
Continue reading
  545 Hits
545 Hits

Still Waiting On Supreme Court To Issue

Still waiting on the Supreme Court to issue their decision on the I.C.W.A. case out of South Carolina.  Could be next week.
Continue reading
  608 Hits
608 Hits

I Just Saw One Of Best Movies That

I just saw one of the best movies that deals with adoption issues I've seen in many years. It deals with the sense of loss the birth parents feel. The joy that the adoptive parents feel. The loss and sense of not being connected to the adoptive family the child feels. Ultimately leading to a reunion and full acceptance by the adult adoptee of the reasons for the placement.

I recommend " Man of Steel" for a number of reasons. It is a fun ride. It's not Superman that I remember as a boy and young adult, but is a Suprman for this and the next generaion. Very well thought out by he writers and very well directed by Zach Snyder.  I won't get into the changes as I don't want to be a spoiler. Go see it and enjoy one of the greatest adoption stories ever told, "Man of Steal"

Continue reading
  592 Hits
592 Hits

Just Got Call From Old Client

Just got a call from an old client. Their daughter is 13 and a star student &  athlete at her school. It is these calls that make my day. No matter what else happens today, knowing this teenager is doing  great is enough. I intend to kiss the wife and both dogs tonight with just a little more joy in my step.
Continue reading
  572 Hits
572 Hits

Today Supreme Court Of United States Is

Today the Supreme Court of the United States is hearing an ICWA case out of South Carolina.  The fate of a three year little girl rest with these nine jurists.  Does Veronica  stay with her biological father or return to her adoptive parents?  The SCOTUS decision is expected in June.

If you are interested in reading about Baby Veronica. Use your search engine and search for " Baby Veronica ICWA ." If you chose to reseach this case, please read both sides before you form an opinion about whose side is the correct side. 

The Indian Child Welfare Act is a Federal Law.  It involves the Native American Tribes and children with indian hereitage placed for adoption.  This case like all cases involving children and their welfare it is very complicated. 

Baby Veronica needs a secure loving  home. Keep her wellbeing in your thoughts.

Continue reading
  541 Hits
541 Hits

March 5 2013 Just Ran Into Old Client

March 5, 2013

Just ran into an old client. We recognized each other right away. Twenty-two years after the fact. It was great to catch up. Her daughter is going to medical school. Her son into the Marine Corps. It's such a rush to hear these positive stories of how well adopted children are doing.

Adoption is more than a career.

Continue reading
  539 Hits
539 Hits

February 11 I Heard Of Interesting Case

February 11

I heard of an interesting case out of New Jersey today. The New Jersey Supreme Court held that prenatal drug use by a mother was not a basis for finding child abuse or neglect.  There needs to be evidence that there is imminent danger to the child or actual evidence of harm to the child.

I hope this frees up more children for direct private placements adoptions without involvement by a social service department bent on fostering.

Continue reading
  554 Hits
554 Hits

February 7 I Read About Two Interesting

February 7

I read about two interesting cases recently. They are not both adoption cases but have implications to the adoption field.

The first one is EX PARTE HOPE ELISABETH ANKROM, an Alabama case dealing with the offense of chemical endangerment of a child. The Supreme Court held that " offense of chemical endangerment of a child , includes unborn children." it is my understanding the child lived 19 minutes.

With addiction being a problem in the adoption field , testing of birth mother candidates is extremely important. If the birth  mother tests positive are the lawyers for the adoptive parents responsible to  report the birth mother as mandatory reporters?

The second case out of Florida allowed for three names to be listed on a birth certificate.  The facts are simple, same-sex female couple used sperm from a known man to impregnate one of the female partners.  It is of interest that the couple were married in Connecticult.

The judge approved the adoption by the spouse and further allowed for all three names to be  listed  on the birth certificate.  Interesting outcome, great minds can differ on the propriety of having more than two parents named on a birth certificate,  but I suspect it is the future.

California already allows for a child to have more than  two parents

"A child can't have too many people who love them." I am not sure who first penned that quote but it seems appropriate here.

Continue reading
  605 Hits
605 Hits